Turkeys

Turkeys

The turkey dates back to the Aztec period where it was discovered being kept for its meat and decorative feathering. There are five recognized subspecies in the USA, but the nominate race (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo, bronze with white in tail) was the one explorers introduced to Europe in the early sixteenth century. William Strickland is reputed to have brought the turkey to England from Spain in 1524. Over the centuries it has also been displayed for its exotic features. Classes for turkeys were offered at the first English Poultry Show in 1845 and a standard for turkeys appeared in the first English Book of Standards in 1865. A few Meleagris g. silvestris (from the Eastern USA seaboard and bronze with brown in tail) have been imported and these are slim, flying wild-looking birds. The standards published here relate solely to the traditional varieties of turkey, which are naturally bred and not related in any way to the modern day, commercial, broad-breasted or dimple-breasted types, which are not considered appropriate for the show pen.

Heavy turkeys:  Bourbon Red, Bronze, Narragansett, Nebraskan Spotted

Light turkeys: Blue (Lavender), Buff, Pied (Cröllwitzer), Norfolk Black, Slate, White

Norfolk Black
Norfolk Black
Buff
Buff
Slate
Slate
Bronze
Bronze
Bourbon Red
Bourbon Red
 

 

Turkeys