Chickens: Hard Feather

Carlisle Old English Game

When the Romans invaded Britain, Julius Caesar wrote in his commentaries that the Britons kept fowls for pleasure and diversion but not for table purposes. Many well-known authorities have considered that cock fighting was the diversion. In 1849 an Act of Parliament was passed making cock fighting illegal in this country, and with poultry exhibitions then taking root, many breeders began to exhibit Game fowls.

The Old English Game Club split in about 1930 as there was already a divergence of birds being shown with larger breasted, horizontally backed, exhibition type birds tending to win, and breeders of these formed the Carlisle Club, developing only some of the original colours. Breeders of the original type, wherein the back is at 45degrees to the ground, maintained the well-balanced, close-heeled, athletic fighting fowl, and formed the Oxford Club, retaining over thirty colours.

It is usually agreed that a good game fowl cannot be a bad colour.

Carlisle Old English Game

Indian Game

To Cornwall must go the credit for giving us the Indian Game. Breeds used in the make-up were the red Asil, black-breasted red Old English Game, and the Malay. The breed has been developed for its abundant quantity of breast meat, in which respect no other breed can equal it. When large table birds were the most popular in this country Indian Game males were chosen as mates for females of such table breeds as the Sussex, Dorking and Orpington, to produce extra large crosses. The females chosen for mating belonged to breeds possessing white flesh and shanks. Jubilee Indian Game are similar to Indians, but the lacing is white; in Indians it is black. The two varieties are often interbred.

Indian Game

Modern Game

By the introduction of Malay crosses, and with the skill of British fanciers, the Modern Game fowl was evolved. Black-red, duckwings, brown-reds, piles, and birchens were the original recognized varieties, the general characteristics being the same for each, and 13 colours are now standardized.

Modern Game

Old English Game bantam

The OEG Standard follows the Carlisle ideal. OEG bantams are of comparatively recent creation. They were evolved largely from the common crossbred bantam of the countryside. Probably there is very little large breed blood in them.

In the large breed it is usually agreed that a good Game bird cannot be a bad colour. This remark does not apply to the bantams, which are show birds only, colour playing a very important part.

Old English Game bantam

Oxford Old English Game

When the Romans invaded Britain, Julius Caesar wrote in his commentaries that the Britons kept fowls for pleasure and diversion but not for table purposes. Many well-known authorities have considered that cock fighting was the diversion. In 1849 an Act of Parliament was passed making cock fighting illegal in this country, and with poultry exhibitions then taking root, many breeders began to exhibit Game fowls. Over thirty colours of Old English Game have been known.

The Old English Game Club split in about 1930 as there was already a divergence of birds being shown with larger breasted, horizontally backed, exhibition type birds tending to win. Breeders of these formed the Carlisle Club, developing only some of the original colours. Breeders of the original type, wherein the back is at 45 degrees to the ground, maintained the well-balanced, close heeled, athletic fighting fowl, and formed the Oxford Club, retaining over thirty colours.

The judge of Oxfords does so with the bird facing away from him to assess the correct balance. It is usually agreed that a good game fowl cannot be a bad colour.

Oxford Old English Game